Latest:

Monday, 16 January 2017

3 Things That Hostel Life Teaches You

As Robert Brault says.Enjoy the little things in life, for one day you’ll look back and realize they were the big things. For all those who prefer staying at home and think the world of their homes let me tell you that hostel life is AWESOME. And what’s more, it is very enriching. Don’t believe me? Read on to three things that hostel life teaches you.

#1. Sharing

One thing almost every hosteler learns is the ability to share. It does not matter whether you never share your headphones with anyone or whether you’re the person who always borrows others’ earphones.

You will learn to share with others, and you will get used to borrowing from others. In the beginning, it might be a little awkward (for both the lender and the borrower), but after a bit of time, people you barely talk to will be borrowing your things (often without even asking). Sharing everything from clothes, shoes and jewellery to dreams, thoughts and stories will become YOUR kind of life in a hostel.


#2. Tears

When I was shifting to my hostel, I was excited, really very excited. I couldn’t wait to get away from my parents. I was excited by the prospect of living life on my own terms, and squeezing as much enjoyment out of life as I could. No more scolding if I did not go to sleep by midnight, no more looks of disapproval if I came home late and no more nagging about eating healthy food. I eagerly unpacked all of my belongings, loving the thrill that came from knowing that I had the power to decide where each thing was to be placed. (In my house, it is my mom who calls the shots. It’s like a universal law that everything is to be kept at a place where mom decides it should be)

And then, (BOOM) mom and dad left. The world tilted on its axis. My heart was crumbling, tears were falling, my soul was empty and I was helpless to do anything but cry. And cry I did, in washrooms hidden from my roommate, in hallways hidden from my classmates, on roads hidden from my acquaintances. Believe me, there was a time when I thought that I could never ever stop crying. (Cold and cough came to my rescue every time someone asked me why my nose was red). But as they say, time heals everything. And bit by bit, the darkness lightened. I was able to smile for real. Piece by piece, my heart healed and I fell in love with the life I was living and the excitement was rekindled. What this whole process taught me is that it’s okay to cry. It doesn’t mean that you’re weak if there are tears in your eyes. Instead, it means that you have the strength to openly accept your emotions.


#3. No Privacy

In a hostel, there is no such thing as privacy. So, if you’re a no, I don’t have anything to hide. I just don’t like people looking through my phone kind of a person, you will have to learn a lot. A hostel is basically a culmination of a horde of humans with completely different ideologies, that align only when there’s mention of the word “Maggi” at 3 am. So, while you might become very defensive about someone using your phone or someone reading through your diary in the beginning, it won’t be long before your roommate would be reading out the text your boyfriend drunk texted you while you’re occupied with changing your clothes.

In a short span of time, your roommate will know you like no one else, because he/she is the one who sits in front of you while you lie to your mom on call. After you get used to it, it is a very wonderful thing that enriches you as a person. The most reserved of humans will start sharing their secrets with the girl/guy who lives below their room, after just a single dose of hostel life.


So, in short, living in a hostel is like getting another degree while you’re still in your college. So go ahead, don’t let simple laziness come in the way of learning. If you never climb the mountain, you will never be able to enjoy the view. Also, no matter what you hear, NOT EVERY HOSTEL HAS BAD FOOD.



Written by Aneri Doshi
What makes my heart race? Books, Coffee and Rain



 
Back To Top
Copyright © 2017    ReviewMantra |  Terms of use  |  Privacy

Protected by Copyscape