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Wednesday, 14 December 2016

2 of The Worst Dictators in World History

Whenever dictatorship is being discussed these two people always come at top of the list. Two people in history, whose name is enough to create fear and considered to be worst people but still most powerful people from history.

Adolf Hitler

20 April 1889 (Braunau am Inn, Austria-Hungary) - 30 April 1945 (Berlin, Germany)

He was a German politician who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945, F├╝hrer ("leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945 and also initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939.

He moved to Germany in 1913 and was decorated during his service in the German Army in World War I. He joined the German Workers' Party, in 1919 and became the leader in 1921. In 1923, he attempted a coup in Munich to seize power. The failed coup resulted in Hitler's imprisonment, during which time he dictated the first volume of his autobiography and political manifesto Mein Kampf ("My Struggle"). After his release in 1924, Hitler gained popular support by attacking the Treaty of Versailles and promoting Pan-Germanism, anti-Semitism, and anti-communism with charismatic oratory and Nazi propaganda.

By 1933, the Nazi Party was the largest elected party in the German Reichstag, which led to Hitler's appointment as Chancellor on 30 January 1933. Following fresh elections won by his coalition, the Reichstag passed the Enabling Act, which began the process of transforming the Weimar Republic into Nazi Germany, a one-party dictatorship based on the totalitarian and autocratic ideology of National Socialism.

Hitler aimed to eliminate Jews from Germany and establish a New Order to counter what he saw as the injustice of the post-World War I international order dominated by Britain and France. His first six years in power resulted in rapid economic recovery from the Great Depression, the effective abandonment of restrictions imposed on Germany after World War I, and the annexation of territories that were home to millions of ethnic Germans—actions which gave him significant popular support.


Kim Jong-il

16 February 1942 – 17 December 2011

He was the supreme leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), commonly referred to as North Korea, from 1994 to 2011. By the early 1980s, Kim had become the heir apparent to the leadership of the country and assumed important posts in the party and army organs. He succeeded his father and founder of the DPRK, Kim Il-sung, following the elder Kim's death in 1994. Kim Jong-il was the General Secretary of the Workers' Party of Korea (WPK), Chairman of the National Defence Commission (NDC) of North Korea, and the Supreme Commander of the Korean People's Army (KPA), the fourth-largest standing army in the world. Kim's leadership is thought to have been even more dictatorial than his father's.

During Kim's regime, the country suffered from famine, partially due to economic mismanagement, and had a poor human rights record. Kim involved his country in state terrorism and strengthened the role of the military by his Songun, or "military-first", politics. Kim's rule also saw tentative economic reforms, including the opening of the Kaesong Industrial Park in 2003.

He was given title during his reign of "The Dear Leader" to distinguish him from his father Kim Il-sung, "The Great Leader".



Written by Pragati Jain
Grew up in Indore, M.P. I am pursuing B.E. in Electronics and Communication from Medi-Caps Indore. I love writing, sports and playing piano.



 
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